VISIT LONDON



                                                         WESTMINSTER ABBEY




London and tour of Westminster Abbey. If you are going to London and have a disabled person in your group, send an email to the Deputy Head of Visitor Experience. We were given a free, three hour, private tour. Such a blessing.


                                            CHANGING OF THE GUARD

A site to behold. That is, if you are tall enough to see over all these people. Thank goodness I am pretty tall and was able to see most of it. My girls are all 5'2" and under. We somehow managed to get them in a space where they could see. They even got pictures and some where better than mine. We didn't realize what time it started, and actually got there by accident. We were so excited because it was on our to do list.
We had just one day in London. We literally walked from one end to the other. Or at least it felt like it. With one daughter who has depth perception problems, one who is legally blind without her glasses, and one who has foot problems, and walks very slowly, I am surprised we logged in about 12 miles, in steps, that day. Someone has to hold the youngest one's hand most of the time or she lags way behind. I always say, one of her arms and one of mine are longer than they should be. Poor girl. But she never complains, just sits down every chance she gets.



Of course we had to try out the phone booths. A thing of the past in America and still around in London but not as many as they had years ago. In fact this was the only one we saw. Tanya loves to make a pose. She makes me smile.

London was pretty easy to get around by foo,t but it is vast and takes great stamina to do this. I suggest a hop on hop off bus. Or Big Bus Tours. I believe most of them are wheelchair accessible. We did not take any buses, but I have read they are quite reliable and have great guides. Check this out before you go.

If you have any other thoughts on visiting London, please feel free to comment.